Using styles

What are styles?

A style is a set of formats that you can apply to selected pages, text, frames, and other elements in your document to quickly change their appearance. When you apply a style, you apply a whole group of formats at the same time.

Most people are used to writing documents according to physical attributes. For example, you might specify the font family, font size, and weight for chapter titles. Using styles means that you can stop saying something like “Times New Roman, 18pt, bold, centered” and, instead, say “title” for describing that particular font usage. In other words, using styles means that you shift the emphasis from what the text looks like to what the text is.

Similarly, you can set up styles for different page formats. For example, the first page of a chapter often has a somewhat different appearance from the other pages: it may have a larger top margin and no header.

Why use styles?

Styles help improve consistency in a document. They also make major formatting changes easy. For example, you may decide to change the indentation of all paragraphs or change the font of all titles. For a long document, this simple task can be prohibitive. Styles make the task easy.

In addition, Writer uses styles in many processes, for example compiling a table of contents. Lastly, all pages are based on styles, as we’ll see in the next section.

Types of styles

Writer has five types of styles, which can be reached from the Styles and Formatting window:

  • Page styles affect page formatting (page size, margin, and the like).
  • Paragraph styles affect entire paragraphs represented with those styles.
  • Character styles affect a block of text inside a paragraph.
  • List styles affect outlines, numbered lists, and bulleted lists.
  • Frame styles affect frames and graphics.
Styles and Formatting window for Writer

Styles and Formatting window for Writer

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This book is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, version 3.0.

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