Using Writer’s drawing tools

You can use Writer’s drawing tools to create graphics, such as simple diagrams using rectangles, circles, lines, text, and other predefined shapes. You can also group several drawing objects to make sure they maintain their relative position and proportion.

You can place the drawing objects directly on a page in your document, or you can insert them into a frame.

You can align, arrange, anchor, and wrap text around drawing objects in ways similar to those described in Positioning images within the text. You can also use the Position and Size tab of the Position and Size dialog for aligning and anchoring drawing objects. To open this dialog, click on the drawing object to select it and then choose Format > Object > Position and Size or right-click on the object and choose Position and Size on the pop-up menu.

You can also use the drawing tools to annotate photographs, screen captures, or other illustrations produced by other programs, but this is not recommended because:

  • You cannot include images in a group with drawing objects, so they may get out of alignment in your document.
  • If you convert a Writer document to another format, such as HTML, the drawing objects and the graphics will not remain associated; they are saved separately.

I recommend you avoid using Writer’s drawing tools to create graphics or annotate other images, because the results can sometimes behave unpredictably. For example, the stacking order of drawing objects doesn’t always stay the way you set it, so a line or circle that should be on top of another object may suddenly end up underneath the object. To avoid potential problems, use a graphics package such as OpenOffice.org Draw or The Gimp (both of which include many more features such as layers, styles, and so on) to create the graphics, then either copy the graphics directly into the Writer document or export them as an image file and import that file into Writer.

<< Previous section | Next section >>


This book is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, version 3.0.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin

Categories

Archives