Merging and splitting cells and tables

Merging and splitting cells

To merge a group of cells into one cell:

  1. Select the cells to merge.
  2. Right-click and select Cell > Merge on the pop-up menu, or select Table > Merge Cells from the menu bar.

To split a cell into multiple cells:

  1. Position the cursor inside the cell.
  2. Right-click and select Cell > Split on the pop-up menu, or select Table > Split Cells from the menu bar.
  3. Select how to split the cell. A cell can be split either horizontally (create more rows) or vertically (create more columns), and you can specify the number of new cells to create.

Merging and splitting tables

One table can be split into two tables, and two tables can be merged into a single table. Tables are split only horizontally (the rows above the split point are put into one table, and the rows below into another).

To split a table:

  1. Place the cursor in a cell which will be in the top row of the second table after the split (the table splits immediately above the cursor).
  2. Right-click and select Split Table in the pop-up menu, or select Table > Split Table from the menu bar.
  3. A Split Table dialog pops up. You can select No heading or an alternative formatting for the heading—the top row(s) of the new table.

The table is then split into two tables separated by a blank paragraph.

To merge two tables:

  1. Delete the blank paragraph between the tables. You must use the Delete key (not the Backspace key) to do this.
  2. Select a cell in the second table.
  3. Right-click and select Merge Tables in the pop-up menu, or select Table > Merge Table from the menu bar.

Tip: To see clearly where the paragraphs are and to delete them easily, select View > Nonprinting Characters (Ctrl+F10) or click the ¶ button in the Standard toolbar.

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This book is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, version 3.0.

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